Crashes and Collisions, Drowsy Driving, fatalities, Fatigue, Uncategorized

Summer – Worst Season For Car Crashes

Summer has arrived – no snow, ice or other weather-related factors infamous for contributing to road hazards. Summer, however, is the worst time of the year for car crashes.  Summertime means vacation time, where more people are on the road. campingvan_vacationtimeWhether travelling across the country in a travelvan or camper, jumping in your car for a road trip, or just escaping for a staycation around town, people have places to go when the weather gets warm. According to the National Highway & Traffic Safety Administration,  there were 35,092 traffic fatalities in 2015, the latest year for which statistics are available for the entire year. Most (9,708) occurred during the third quarter, July through September, followed by fourth quarter fatalities (9,284) during October through December, second quarter fatalities (8,765) during April through June and first quarter fatalities (7,335) during January through March.

Perhaps more traffic fatalities happen during warm weather months because people tend to stay at home during the cold weather months – it’s not a pleasant ordeal to hit the road when it is freezing outside, not to mention the weather-related factors serving as road hazards. Plus, more people save their vacation time for summer, when the kids are out of school and the weather is great. What can you do to prepare for the warm weather road travel? First and foremost, plan
your trip. Driving for long stretches can cause fatigue and drowsy driving. Beware of the symptoms that should tell a driver to stop and rest.

  • Difficulty focusing, frequent blinking, or heavy eyelids.
  • Trouble remembering the last few miles driven; missing exits or traffic signs.
  • Yawning repeatedly or rubbing your eyes.
  • Trouble keeping your head up.

Yawning while drivingAccording to the National Sleep Foundation’s Sleep in America poll, 60% of Americans have driven while feeling sleepy and 37% admit to actually having fallen asleep at the wheel in the past year. However, many people cannot tell if or when they are about to fall asleep. Studies show that sleepiness can impair driving performance as much or more so than alcohol. The American Automobile Association (AAA) estimates that one out of every six (16.5%) deadly traffic accidents, and one out of eight (12.5%) crashes requiring hospitalization of car drivers or passengers is due to drowsy driving. (AAA, 2010). One analysis estimated the cost of automobile accidents attributed to sleepiness to be between $29.2 to $37.9 billion.

Research has revealed a few indicators of drowsiness and drowsy driving. that include:

  • Frequent blinking, longer duration blinks and head nodding
  • Having trouble keeping one’s eyes open and focused
  • Memory lapses or daydreaming
  • Drifting from one’s driving lane or off the road

Currently, there is no definitive physiologic test or detection system for drowsiness equivalent to the breath analyzers used to detect drunk driving.

The National Sleep Foundation has published a White Paper on Drowsy Driving, containing more details about Drowsy Driving being a prevalent and serious public health issue that deserves more attention, education, and policy initiatives. Their aim is to avert drowsy driving crashes so a substantial amount of lives can be saved.

Distracted Driving, Uncategorized

#JustDrive kicks off distracted driving month

justdrive_$20
JustDrive.com offers a host of information about the risks and dangers of talking or texting behind the wheel and other forms of distracted driving.

What is the best way to save $200? Ask the New Jersey Motor Vehicles Commission, and they’ll tell you…… the fines for talking or texting on a handheld device have increased to $200 for the first offense and $400 for the second offense. Fines for the third offense are a minimum of $600 plus a possible 90-day suspension of driver’s license and three (3) motor vehicle penalty points. Don’t talk or text while you drive, and you are sure to save at least $200 – clever!

As we kick off the month of April, we will be exploring the campaigns taking place across the country to help avoid crashes and collisions caused by #DistractedDriving, beginning with our friends from the Garden State. Watch the videos, read the stories and consider the tips and take the pledge offered online at http://justdrive.com/.

Distracted Driving, Uncategorized

#DistractedDriving kills and injures thousands of people each year.

Safe driving requires that a driver master 1500 tasks. Any non-driving activity you engage in is a potential distraction and increases your risk of crashing. That includes hi-viz billboards, talking or texting on your phone, eating and drinking, talking to passengers, looking for a radio station, setting a navigation system — anything that takes your attention away from the task of safe driving.

 

famouslastwords
Anna, such an eager little girl……

 

The National Highway and Traffic Safety Administration provides tips on how we can all play a part in the fight to save lives by ending distracted driving:

TEENS

Teens can be the best messengers with their peers, so we encourage them to speak up when they see a friend driving while distracted, to have their friends sign a pledge to never drive distracted, to become involved in their local Students Against Destructive Decisions chapter, and to share messages on social media that remind their friends, family, and neighbors not to make the deadly choice to drive distracted.

PARENTS

Parents first have to lead by example—by never driving distracted—as well as have a talk with their young driver about distraction and all of the responsibilities that come with driving. Have everyone in the family sign the pledge to commit to distraction-free driving. Remind your teen driver that in States with graduated driver licensing (GDL), a violation of distracted-driving laws could mean a delayed or suspended license.

EDUCATORS AND EMPLOYERS

Educators and employers can play a part, too. Spread the word at your school or workplace about the dangers of distracted driving. Ask your students to commit to distraction-free driving or set a company policy on distracted driving.

Driver Improvements joins efforts to make our voices heard. Tomorrow, #DistractedDriving Prevention Month begins. If you feel strongly about distracted driving, be a voice in your community by supporting local laws, speaking out at community meetings, and highlighting the dangers of distracted driving on social media and in your local op-ed pages.

 

Texting is the most alarming distraction. Sending or reading a text takes your eyes off the road for 5 seconds. At 55 mph, that’s like driving the length of an entire football field with your eyes closed.

 

Drug-Impaired Driving, Drunk Driving, DUI/DWI/OWI/OWAI, Holiday Travel, Uncategorized

Apps to keep drunk drivers off the road

 

Stop_DUI
STOPDUI.ORG one of our featured apps to lessen the occurrences of driving while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.  Source:  www.stopdui.org

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, thousands are killed each year by alcohol-impaired drivers:
–  10,322 people were killed in alcohol-impaired-driving crashes in the U.S. in 2012 – those fatalities accounted for one-third of motor vehicle traffic fatalities
–  The number of fatalities from drunk driving crashes increased 4.6% from 2011 to 2012
Drunk driving is particularly notorious around the year-end holidays, where more police patrols are on alert for drunk drivers, and designated driver programs are in full swing. @smartccouncil has published information on smartphone applications developed to keep drunk drivers off the road:

*  The Wisconsin Department of Transportation supports the drive campaign, ZERO IN WISCONSIN.  The mobile app was developed to assist individuals who may be intoxicated to find a safe ride home, and comes in a several  languages.

*  Maryland has ENDUI to educate people about making good choices when drinking by estimating the user’s blood alcohol content.  The app also has games to help them gauge their response times and features call buttons, for a designated driver, a taxi or to report a drunk driver.

*  The Stop-DWI HAVE A PLAN app features an impairment estimator, a GPS feature for taxi service and an  interactive app with four skill assessments that test a user’s mobility, reaction time, memory and accuracy.

*  To report drunk drivers, use DUI  CAM by placing a smartphone in a dashboard mount. The app  can scan the make/model of the car and zoom in on the license plate of suspected intoxicated drivers. Once the screenshot or video is saved, it can be sent via email or texted/called in to authorities.