cannabis, Drug-Impaired Driving, Legislative Affairs

Greenbacks – dollars from marijuana cultivation to the rescue of dying towns

Greenback_movement_blogentry

The Greenback Movement has resurfaced in California, giving new meaning to currencies. As the largest grower and consumer of marijuana in the country, California is in the midst of a booming business that has brought prosperity and needed revenue to dying towns. Take Adelanto, for example, brought back from the verge of bankruptcy by tax revenues from the marijuana industry. Commenting on marijuana grow operations discovered in his city, Mayor Richard Kerr stated that they were dealing with medical marijuana cultivation on a legal basis and would not tolerate illegal operations in the city.  And legal they made it, passing City Ordinance 545 that sanctions large-scale commercial cannabis cultivation.  By jumping on the bandwagon of transforming the most populous state in the US and one of the world’s largest economies into a new epicenter for cannabis, Kerr and other city officials passing ordinances that legalize the cultivation of cannabis hope to fatten their coffers by bringing in this new-found base for tax revenue. According to a local newspaper story, cultivators could churn out roughly 50,000 pounds of marijuana up to six times a year at cultivation centers like the ones envisioned for Adelanto.

Known as the jail town of the high desert, Adelanto has four prisons within the city limits that house some 3,340 county, state and federal inmates, with another prison soon to be built.  Adelanto’s take each year from prison-related revenue amounts to $160,000. City planners estimate that the larger facilities in this nascent marijuana industry should bring in taxes of about $75,000 every three months, with total tax revenue reaching $12 million by the end of the year.

So far, 43 cultivation permits have been approved, and land prices have sky-rocketed, which will bring in additional revenue in the form of property taxes. Investors and cultivators have been told they need not fear raids since they would be complying with city and state laws. But what about federal laws?  Despite states passing laws regarding the legalization of cannabis for medical and recreational use, the drug is still illegal under federal law, it is still illegal to transport cannabis across state lines, and it is still a crime to drive under the influence of marijuana. The federal government regulates drugs through the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) (21 U.S.C. § 811), which does not recognize the difference between medical and recreational use of cannabis. These laws are generally applied against persons who possess, cultivate, or distribute large quantities of cannabis, but federal agencies still have the prerogative to seize property on which pot is grown, levy fines and even send people to prison.

The CSA classifies every drug, and under federal law, cannabis is treated like every other controlled substance, such as cocaine and heroin. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, marijuana) is a CSA Schedule 1 drug with a high potential for abuse (i.e. is highly addictive) and with no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States. Additionally, there is a lack of accepted safety for use of the drug under medical supervision let alone individual use. Scary thoughts for those of use having to share the road with drugged drivers.

 

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